Soapstone Bullet Mold

1872.19.jpg
The two months following the battles at Lexington and Concord in April 1775 were tense and uncertain. The British Army, besieged in Boston, and the colonial militias to the north and west were in a standoff across the Charles River. As they maneuvered into position, they prepared for a battle that both sides expected would come. This bullet mold, one of many used by the American forces, was “kept hot night and day for two weeks before Bunker Hill.”

Soapstone was, and is, a valuable mineral with many uses. Because it is comprised primarily of talc, it’s very soft and easy to work with. Soapstone is durable and stands up to heat remarkably well. As a result, it was an ideal material for bullet molds.

About This Item

Date

June, 1775

Description

Soapstone bullet mold, 2.25" x 3.17" x 0.75", Boston, Bunker Hill

Type

Identifier

1872.19

Topic

Collection

Citation

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Assoc./Memorial Hall Museum, “Soapstone Bullet Mold,” Revolution Happened Here, accessed September 20, 2021, https://revolutionhappenedhere.org/items/show/12.

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